Tag Archives: #guns

Guns: The INSANITY CONTINUES TO “Happen”

There is a broad majority in favor of changing gun laws in this country. That majority should reject anyone who dismisses the insanity by saying or supporting the statement: “stuff happens.”

I wrote the following in 2012, after the mass killing at Sandy Hook.

in Homicide Rate U.S. versus Britain: 100 TIMES GREATER CHANCE OF BEING SHOT IN U.S.

I was having dinner at an outdoor café one afternoon in London when suddenly I saw a scene that could have been from a movie. First a man holding a package ran past us as fast as he could run, followed by a man dressed as a chef waving a meat cleaver in pursuit, shouting “stop thief!” Both in turn followed by whistle-blowing Bobbies. The cops caught up with their man and paraded by in the opposite direction.

Something evidently was missing from the picture: no f-ing guns.

We are all at a loss for what to say about guns after the Connecticut [note, or Colorado, or Oregon or…..] massacre. How many more times before leaders will stand up?

Listen to Europeans this evening or read their newspapers tomorrow. Another mass killing across the water, they will say — “the Wild West,” using those very words in Spain, Italy many other countries in the original, not bothering to translate. There will be sympathy in Europe, but there will be sneers.

Britain, where bad guys have to run for and their pursuers carry sticks, has one of the toughest gun control laws in the world.

The intentional homicide rate in Britain is 0.03 per 100,000 people, ranked just under Japan at 0.02 per hundred thousand. Among other European countries, the rate in France is 0.06; Spain, 0.63; Germany, 1.10; Italy, 1.28.

The rate of intentional homicides in the United States is 2.98, 100 TIMES HIGHER than the rate in Britain.

No gun control advocate in Britain — where people with a license have no problem to go hunting and shoot squirrels and foxes with shotguns – right-wing or not could ever use guns a campaign issue.

The gun lobby in the United States is wrong and has to be stopped. No one will lose his or her right to go hunting. Everyone must lose the right to carry concealed or automatic weapons to kill.

What country is this and what century is this?

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Guns Abroad — How Others See Americans

Guns turned in voluntarily after Australian law took effect (AP)

Once, when I was a kid, a lady in Germany was shocked that I was an American who could speak to her in her own language and took advantage. “Where’s your six-shooter,” she asked. Another time, entering New Zealand, a customs official thought about patting me down for drugs and weapons. “Florida, eh? he said raising an eyebrow.

That’s the way they see us.

Such is the case with U.S. gun violence; President Obama’s announcements on gun control were big news.

Australian television, for example, chose an extreme talking head, Larry Pratt, president of the Gun Owners of America, to discuss the issue.

By way of context, Australia imposed gun laws that worked in 1996 after a shocking mass killing. Former Prime Minister John Howard described the success of Australia’s laws in an op-ed article in the New York Times.

Here’s a section of the interview with Mr. Pratt on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

LEIGH SALES: In Australia, the government reacted to a massacre in 1996 by banning the sale, importation and possession of semi-automatic rifles and by removing 700,000 guns from circulation.

In the 18 years before that we had 13 massacres. After that we had zero. We didn’t have a civil war, the government didn’t come and take all of our stuff away from us. Why not just give it a try in the US?

LARRY PRATT: Once you’ve given it a try there’s no going back and so in the United States we’re not going to do that. In the United States we are citizens in control of the government and as the Swiss say to this day, a rifle is the emblem of a free man.

LEIGH SALES: But it worked in Australia. Why not just try it?

LARRY PRATT: Your violent crime rate is not so admirable and besides…

LEIGH SALES: It’s a lot lower than yours.

LARRY PRATT: We’re not interested in being like Australia. We’re Americans.

An American friend of mine visiting Australia called attention to the interview. “Doubtless Larry Pratt left the show pleased with his no holds barred defense of Americans’ right to own automatic weapons,” my friend said, “but I have to say that as the segment ended I felt sick.”

It is called American exceptionalism. Overseas, it is a farce.

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“A [political] change coming on”

muse of history“I feel a change comin’ on
Though the last part of the day’s already gone”
Bob Dylan and Robert Hunter

We may be witnessing a sea-change in American politics, but we’re too close to know exactly what it is. How can Republicans and their losing agenda survive when a majority of people in the United States support exactly what Republicans hate, issues including: gun-control; a woman’s right to choose; and the government role in health care. Oh and one more thing, a majority of Americans have just re-elected President Barack Obama. Republicans are not a happy lot.

There’s an interesting analysis by George Packer in The New Yorker that describes a progressive change in political alignment — the South was solidly Democratic until Lyndon Johnson’s 1964 Civil Rights Act, Republicans have been ensconced one way or another ever since. “At the same time,” Packer writes….

the Southern way of life began to be embraced around the country until, in a sense, it came to stand for the “real America”: country music and Lynyrd Skynyrd, barbecue and nascar, political conservatism, God and guns, the code of masculinity, militarization, hostility to unions, and suspicion of government authority, especially in Washington, D.C. (despite its largesse). In 1978, the Dallas Cowboys laid claim to the title of “America’s team”—something the San Francisco 49ers never would have attempted. In Palo Alto, of all places, the cool way to express rebellion in your high-school yearbook was with a Confederate flag. That same year, the tax revolt began, in California.

We hear a protest movement from that “real America,’ secession nonsense and defiance. Governors and legislators who are sworn to uphold BOTH the U.S. Constitution AND their state constitutions advocate defiance of federal programs, health insurance or any move from Washington to control guns.

Packer says the change, as far as we see so far, is that Republicans, controlled and distorted by this Southern bloc, can no longer lead.

The Southern bloc in the House majority can still prevent the President from enjoying any major legislative achievements, but it has no chance of enacting an agenda, and it’s unlikely to produce a nationally popular figure.

Where is it all headed? Interesting question on the eve of the inauguration of second term for a man who has repeatedly cited his own unlikely road to the White House. That man is a member of a new generation, a product as we all are, but not a part, of the South.

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Let’s be real: Guns in America

Even after the horrors of Connecticut, it is doubtful that Congress would pass a sweeping gun control law, but something can be done. There are two sides to this story.

Changing attitudes and fixing things are a process. Many gun owners think there is a conspiracy against them, which there isn’t. Egged on by the National Rifle Association, they say that any gun regulation leads to the banning of all private ownership of guns. That will never happen.

But why would a guy who shoots skeet need to protect the use of assault weapons, like AR-15’s with huge clips in them? Nobody on the street needs those.

So we should demand and expect small steps acceptable to everyone, including the likely swing voter on the Supreme Court: Anthony Kennedy. We should be able to do this:

–End the sale of assault weapons, automatic and semi-automatic.

–End the sale of large ammo magazines.

–Regulate the activities of gun shows and online gun sales

—Debate, review and tighten gun licensing laws nationwide.

Let’s get real on all sides and achieve the possible.

 

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Gun Homicide Rate U.S. versus Britain: 100 TIMES GREATER CHANCE OF BEING SHOT IN U.S.

I was having dinner at an outdoor café one afternoon in London when suddenly I saw a scene that could have been from a movie. First a man holding a package ran past us as fast as he could run, followed by a man dressed as a chef waving a meat cleaver in pursuit, shouting “stop thief!” Both in turn followed by whistle-blowing Bobbies. The cops caught up with their man and paraded by in the opposite direction.

Something evidently was missing from the picture: no f-ing guns.

We are all at a loss for what to say about guns after the Connecticut massacre. How many more times before leaders will stand up?

Listen to Europeans this evening or read their newspapers tomorrow. Another mass killing across the water, they will say — “the Wild West,” using those very words in Spain, Italy many other countries in the original, not bothering to translate. There will be sympathy in Europe, but there will be sneers.

Britain, where bad guys have to run for and their pursuers carry sticks, has one of the toughest gun control laws in the world.

The intentional homicide rate in Britain is 0.03 per 100,000 people, ranked just under Japan at 0.02 per hundred thousand. Among other European countries, the rate in France is 0.06; Spain, 0.63; Germany, 1.10; Italy, 1.28.

The rate of intentional homicides in the United States is 2.98, 100 TIMES HIGHER than the rate in Britain.

No gun control advocate in Britain — where people with a license have no problem to go hunting and shoot squirrels and foxes with shotguns – right-wing or not could ever use guns a campaign issue.

The gun lobby in the United States is wrong and has to be stopped. No one will lose his or her right to go hunting. Everyone must lose the right to carry concealed or automatic weapons to kill.

What country is this and what century is this?

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